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: steve cohen in davos at the world economic forum, but in stand jfn ford, connecticut scrambling for row depletions. there's an fcc investigation into the company, and what are they saying. what do you think knows? the man next to me now, charlie. >> you know, it's funny that, you know, when people heard the story, doing it, they think i'm burying the lead. the big story here is that steve cohen is in davos. cheryl: raising money? shaking hands? >> good point. as we know, as we were first to report, they are expecting massive redemptions amid the investigations as well as the criminal probe into the fund managers where cohen was involved, though, it's unclear whether he knew inside information was passed around. that's what's going on. it's clear that the government wants to make a case criminal and civil against cohen, and fcc capital. here's what they are saying, particularly about the civil case. the civil case resulted in a wells notice saying the staff intends to charge the target. the target here is sac, and if they settle, it's going to be a big fine, and they are telling investor
be described as a flu epidemic. >> senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is live in ft. worth, texas, with what may be some good news. she has an early read on the new flu numbers that we're getting. elizabeth, what have you learned? >> the cdc every friday release the new flu numbers. i got an early look at them. as you said a little bit of good news. the flu activity in this country has gone down a bit. two weeks ago we were talking about 29 states having high levels of flu activity. now we're talking about 24 states having high level of flu activity. that is good news. now i want to talk about the numbers in a sightly different way. this gets confusing, so bear with me. we're seeing less flu in the united states, but it is spread out more. geographically it has spread out to more locations. so, to put that in terms of numbers, two weeks ago, 41 states were seeing widespread activity, meaning it was throughout various regions of their state. now 47 states say they're seeing flu in various regions of their state. so spread out more, but the actual number of people who are having flu
's the latest from the fox business network, giving you the power to prosper. lori: hedge fund titan steve cohen is in davos, believe it or not at the world economic forum. you are surprised to hear that. melissa: i thought he had some issues. didn't think he would go over there. lori: they are at the headquarters in connecticut scrambling to stem the redemptions from the embattle hedge fund and answers questions from nervous investors about an sec investigation. what are they say? charlie gasparino has exclusive details. >> kind of interesting he is there. lori: what is he trying to do, gin up sympathy? >> he has gone in the past. there is incredible regulatory and prosecutorial interest in steve cohen and. there is wells notice. that means the sec's enforcement decision has recommended to the full commission they bring charges against the company. he personally is not mentioned in that wells notice but, you know, that is pretty dangerous stuff because the sec could theoretically shut shim down as a registered hedge fund which means he can manage his own money but can't take investor money. her
to bar u.s. human rights abuses. some say this is all evidence of a new cold war. stephen cohen is a professor at nyu and william brodeur was an ambassador in russia, and was his former employer and he is, of course, one of the biggest proponents behind the magnitsky act. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> william, explain the importance of the act from your point of view? >> very simply, it is a piece of legislation which is sort of designed for the modern day problems of what's going on in russia. in russia, you have a regime which is basically out to steal as much money as possible from their own people. in response to that, when people try to stop it in any way, like sergei magnitsky, they get killed. what the act does is it creates consequences for the corrupt murdering kelp to crates running russia today and creates consequences outside of russia by banning their visas and freezing their assets in america. >> steve cohen, you disagree with the magnitsky act. do you wish congress hadn't passed it? >> i do for many reasons, but as you said in your introduction i think mos
cohen's capital bracing for massive redemptions amid a wide ranging investigation into possible insider trading violations at the big huge fund although the fund is up this year. how long does up this year last? >> i mean, he's doing very well amid, like, a lot of pressure. we have to point out that, this is what i love about being on fox business, you know, sometimes like david versus goliath; right? we write the story monday, i did, you were traveling to one of your affairs. liz: the story that -- >> that fc capital was meeting with hedge fund managers, bracing for massive redemptions -- liz: pulling my money out? >> if you read the "wall street journal," they copied our lead five days later, it came out today. what the journal missed, and in addition to becoming very late on the story, they missed why it's happening. it's not necessarily that people want to hate steve because they don't. i can tell you that financial advice, guys who control money, the fun, the funds that invest in individual hedge funds, i know a lot of people like that. they love steve and the fat he's up this year
cold war. stephen cohen is a professor at nyu and william browder was his former employer and he is, of course, one of the biggest proponents behind the magnitski act. william, explain the importance of the act from your point of view? >> very simply, it is a piece of legislation which is sort of designed for the modern day problems of what's going on in russia. in russia, you have a regime which is basically out to steal as much money as possible from their own people. when people try to stop it in any way, like sergeis magnitsky, they get killed. the corrupt running russia today and creates consequences outside of russia by banning their visas and freezing their assets in america. >> steve cohen, you disagree with the magnitsky act. >> i do for many reasons, but as you said in your introduction i think moscow and washington are sliding into a new cold war, which would be very bad for national security and the magnitsky act further poisons the relationship. mr. browder is right to a certain extent, but not quite as simple as he says. even though this may be this act just a lot of w
and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in c
has new details on steve cohen. melissa: you are always controversial. charlie: here is what is interesting about steve cohen. in february, as they see faces a window of redemptions. here is what we know. fac officials are screaming to prevent massive reductions. they are currently contacting and holding one-on-one meetings with investors. they are essentially saying that despite everything, the investigation -- a wells notice has been given. despite all of that, they think that steve cohen we'll be okay. they may get a large fine. they think they are facing charges. they will not be indicted. it will not be a criminal case. keep your money with us. the bottom line is this, you do not know until february. investors essentially hate this type of controversy. some very large investors have put holds on the stocks. i can also tell you, steve cohen and these guys are very aggressive. they are out there trying to get large investors to stay with it. they will come out after the story. these are different one-on-one meetings. this is crisis mode. they think there is a very good lik
-public information with his boss, the billionaire hedge fund manager steve cohen of sac capital. martoma's big tip allegedly taking place during a 20-minute phone call to cohen the day before the news of the drug failing a key trial became public. sac sold its position before that public announcement netting the firm a profit and avoiding losses totaling $276 million. sac declined comment on today's arraignment and they claim they acted appropriately and are cooperating with the government. martoma is the fifth sac employee to be charged with securities fraud while working at the hedge fund. one other has been named as a co-conspirator. martoma also seemed critical to securing what many believe is the government's ultimate catch, mr. cohen. because of the phone call that he made to mr. cohen in july of 2008. unlike three other former sac employees though, he has refused to cooperate or strike a deal maintaining all the while that he is innocent. now today's arraignment should be quick. basically mr. martoma will enter his plea and then possibly the judge will likely set a schedule for discovery or
's check in with dr. ron cohen, the founder and ceo of acorda therapeutics. welcome back to "mad money." >> thanks very much, jim. >> i was going back to our interview in july of last year, and so much has changed. at the time you were only talking about pre-clinical or rat studies of what your drug could be for stroke. since then, i was looking at your presentation this morning -- this week. 66 people with stroke, at least six months trying this. give me the progression. there have got to be people initially happy with the post stroke deficit study. >> well, it's still a blinded study, jim. that means we have no idea who's done well on placebo versus drug, but we're going to find out pretty soon. we're getting the results of that trial in the second quarter of this year. we're very excited to see those results. >> i think people want to understand, it's not just everybody who has had a stroke. it's a particular kind of people who face a stroke problem, right? >> yeah, well, about half the people who have had a stroke wind up with permanent disabilities. as a result, reduced mobility,
. >>> better news this morning about the flu. cnn's elizabeth cohen got a look at new numbers out from the cdc, numbers set to officially be released later today. the number of cases are actually down with 24 states reporting high levels of flu last week, compared to 29 the week before. however, there were two more pediatric deaths, bringing the total to 20 and by pediatric deaths we mean children of course. in chicago, flu patients are overwhelming the city's already strained hospitals though with still quite the outbreak there. here's cnn's ted rowlands. >> no nausea at this point. >> reporter: deborah cross started feeling sick on monday, three days later she ended up in the emergency room at cook county hospital in chicago, where it was so busy, she had to wait four hours to be seen. >> decided to be safe and come here make sure that everything was okay. >> reporter: several hospitals in chicago this week were forced to reject patients for several hours because of so many flu cases. on monday, 11 different hospitals in the chicago area couldn't handle any more patients. non-life-threatenin
is now a senior counselor with the common group. -- cohen group. now he is the new director of woodrow wilson center's mexico institute. congratulations on that. he is on the editorial board of foreign affairs, latino america. to get started, let's go ahead and start with you, luis carlos, on the evolution of mexico's political system. what may be the future of mexico's political parties. >> good morning. thank you for this invitation. let me give you a brief overview of what has happened and mexican democracy for the past 20 years or so. i argue in this new book, my guess is that mexico's elections and democracy have had a limited effect on the quality of democracy -- i stayed that mexico's elections and democracy have had a limited effect on the quality of democracy. client ellison got stronger. -- the rule of law is weak, as it was in the 20th century. is not a priority in the minds of most politicians in mexico. in general, mexicans lack of an esteemed for legality. that has been pretty much the same over the past 20 or 30 years. the levels of impunity and mexico continue to be abo
on the real police officers who tried to bring down mobster mickey cohen in the late 1940s. movie reviewer kevin mccarthy talked with ryan guessling who says the character plays was a real-life hero. >> your character initially turns down the invitation to be in the gangster squad. it could become perm and you say i'm going to do this and you join the squad. over the years in your year, is there a role that you initially turned down and you went back stand took it again. >> first of all, important to note -- the man i play is based on the relate man. the man himself real cooler. for african-american dattic purposes, the real jerry routers needed no convincing. >> right n in terms of character -- >> right. in terms of characters i turned down i did a film called blue valentine. i didn't think i could do it because i was too young to do it. >> i think the new sequence is you be believable. as an actor, where is that balance of reshooting something for artistic value and keeping the story intact and doing it because you have to do it for offensive sub matter. >> it is a hard question to answe
activity. the yellow states have local activity. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now. this has been a bad season. i call it the whoop, when i hear that cough, i go you got the whoop. >> and you get away as quuckly as possible. >> you smile and back out of the room. >> how bad has the flu season been? >> it's been one of the worst flu seasons in the past decade, maybe only two or three has been as bad as this year. flu can hit early, like in november, december, which is what happened this year, or it can hit later, like january, february, or even later like march and so this has been a really early flu season. not a terrible flu season, but an early flu season. >> now, because it's so early, does that give us any indication how bad it will get? >> i was talking to folks at the cdc last night, and they said, look, we think it will be a moderate to severe season overall. so, worse than last year but not as bad as some other years. >> when i hear that whoop somewhere in this building -- >> i heard it many times in this building. >> i think i didn't get a flu shot. is
at this. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us from one of the southern states in atlanta. i hope you are feeling okay to do the segment. >> i can't even tell you how many people who i know who were sick with flu or flu-like illness. >> including me. >> and you're up there. >> and i'm up here and i didn't get the flu shot and i don't get it every year. >> ashleigh, did i teach you nothing? >> do you know what, you're brilliant and i'm busy. >> you're very sweet. next year i'm flying up there. >> just how bad is it? is it any different, i always say it's so bad this year, i feel like i say the same story every year. is it something different? is the strain different? >> no, what is weird or a little different is it started early. when you look at the past ten years, there were only two, maybe three seasons where we saw this much flu this early and it kept growing and growing. so, the cdc just a couple of hours ago came out with new numbers i'll share with you, ashleigh, if you look at last week, there were 29 states that had high levels of flu. the week before th
. for the record redoing third event is coming near. >> and also eliot cohen is in raise the intellectual godfather of this book. his book says syrian command. his book supreme command is the best single thing ever written on how president should talk to the military. >> fantastic. autonomy said that. >> inÉs said. [laughter] >> my question coming out of the strategicprogram is two pronged mlb on this i have your book yet, so i hope you have a nerdy answer this. but the very well-publicized job done in afghanistan appeared to asia, what gives you hope when it comes to future generalship and what makes you despair? >> second part is easier to answer. a lot of things make me despair. what gives me hope that it's going to some perverse, but it's not. the defense budget is going to be cut and let us cut as the british famously said we have no money anymore, so now we must need. we have a military that is at a fire hose of money turned on the last 10 years and intelligence community community as well. they were basically given money and told her to spend it through the we have a generation of officers
correspondent scott cohen joins me now. good evening. >> good evening, larry. it is a big problem. enough so now that lentders and credit rating agencies are starting to look at the potential impact on a whole generation of borrowers. the ones who are supposed to have spending power and the early signs aren't good. a new study from transunion. average debt more than $23,000. up 30% in the past five years. more than half of all student loans now in deferral including payments deferred while the borrower is in school but also borrowers who get deferrals for financial hardship. delinquencies are up from five years ago. more than twice the delinquency rate for mortgages and more than ten time it is rate for credit cards. the problem isn't the level of student debt only. it's a that the job market is the worst in more than a decade for new grads. 50% unemployed or underemployed. >> that's a brutal report. my only thought listening to you and the numbers, are we headed for bailout nation? is this a taxpayer bailout? >> it looks bad. if you compare it to the housing market we are talking about a trilli
. scott cohen is here with the story and ways to protect yourself more importantly. hi, scott. >> this is a crime of choice for identity thieves. they see it as easy to commit tough to enforce and it is hell on victims. >> that's her in my dress. >> for terry and stephanie, it was an ep log to their worst nightmare. >> it was awful. >> still mourning the death of their 5-month-old daughter, katelynn, they filed their tax return but the irs rejected it. someone else already claimed katelynn as a dependent. >> felt violated. >> and the very last time we today claim her as our own. >> tax identity theft, virtually unheard of, a few years ago, is exploding. total cost more than $5 billion. in alabama, the owners of this tax preparation business admitted stealing hundreds of identities aeb millions of dollars in refunds. in florida, police are breaking up parties, featuring lessons on tax identity theft. they believe crooks got katelynn's identity from a social security death file. public record. >> anyone who dies goes on this list. >> at the justice department, tax division, wher
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
autism lost their symptoms as they grew older. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen here to talk to me about this study. first, just explain the study. >> it is fascinating because it turns conventional wisdom on its head. doctors thought you can't outgrow autism once you're diagnosed, that's it. you have it. these researchers found 34 kids who were diagnosed with autism by good doctors who know what they're doing as very young kids before the age of 5, and then they -- years later when they looked at them, they didn't have any signs of autism. they were examined and the signs were gone. >> so how is this even possible? >> a couple of things going on. they found in some ways this group of kid had somewhat milder autism to begin with, that's one thing. it could also have something to do with the early intervention that these kids got, some of the training and the schooling and what have you, the therapy these kids got. and it also might have something to do with the children's individual brains. maybe there was something about their brains. and researchers have told me, you know,
kuzami who will step down next month after four years. scott cohen sat down for an amazing interesting interview. >> amazing how the s.e.c. has opened up. they are more confident. robert khuzami worked for mary jo white at one time and like her she he's seen wall street from all sides. he was a federal prosecutor and just before heading to the s.e.c. he was a general counsel on wall street at deutsch bank. has he been tough enough on his former colleagues? khuzami says yes. >> there was misconduct. we're going after it. but there are pages of risk disclosure. lawyers reviewed this material. in many case it is risks that later came to pass were disclosed. >> you used to be a wall street lawyer. are they that smart, that good? >> if you buy an investment product and you're warned of a risk that something may happen and that comes to pass, the law says the person who sold it to you hasn't violated the law. >> that's not to say khuzami and company haven't been tough on wall street. the s.e.c. said since he took the job in 2009 more than 150 people have been charged and 2.6 billion dollars
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us with more. >> this will really be interesting to see what they find here because nothing quite like this has ever been done. in essence, this is what they're thinking about doing. take 1,000 players and really follow them, look at their medical records, get measurements and look at all sorts of stuff, and then pick your 100 healthiest, and pick your 100 sickest, and then compare them, and one of the things that they will likely be looking for is how much does football have to do with it? are they sicker because they play a certain position or because they played for a longer period of time and talking about current players and former players and so this is something that's been negotiated and talked about. the nfl says nothing is more important than the health and safety of their players and if you're really into this, cnnhealth.com my colleague stephanie smith has a wonderful article. >> i was talking to two nfl players yesterday about concussions and one of them is going to donate his brain to science in essence and he said it's difficult to know exactly
cohen is a neurologist at the institute of st. luke's hospital here. welcome. >> thank you. >> we know lighting causes headaches. there are a whole range of other things but is weather one of them? >> yeah. so a lot of patients with migraines will notice headaches are worse before a storm rolls in they'll start to feel the headaches as the pressure changes. we think the bear metric pressure is the cause of the headaches. >> millions of americans have debilitating headaches. what causes migraines? >> it's a jeannette ek disorder. they're actually born with it. at some point in their life they get it. for women it's around the menstrual period. other things can bring it on including stressful life events head trauma can start the headaches. >> if you have a migraine what should you do? >> there are a lot of didn't treatments available for migraine. oftentimes patients will start with over-the-counter medications but most will need prescription medications that are specifically targeted toward the changes in the brain that happen during a migraine. >> i told yo
trying to build an insider trading case against sac founder, cohen, and suspending the production worldwide following a recommendation from the european medicine agency committee. now, the drug was under review in europe after a failure of a major study raisedded safety concerns. the grinch stole christmas at toys "r" us. it fell 4.5% during the key months of november and december compared to a year ago. the company says weak demand for video games, electronics, and, well, toys hurt sales. giving you the power to prosper. a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen anjeremiah. they don't know it
. now cnn medical correspondent elizabeth cohen has the top five most calorie-laden items out there. and some of them may surprise you. >> wolf, when you see some of these calorie counts, your eyes are going to pop out. because some of these dishes are more calories in the one dish than you're supposed to have in the entire day. so let's do a countdown. this is from the center for science in the public interest. on their list, number five, uno's chicago grill, deep dish macaroni and three cheese. 1,980 calories. now, to put that in perspective, you're supposed to have about 2,000 calories a day and you're getting almost all of that in one dish. number four, johnny rockets bacon cheddar double burger with sweet potato fries, 2,360 calories. and at number three, from the cheesecake factory, crispy chick yn costaletta, a whopping 2,610 calories. number two, veal porterhouse with crispy red potatoes. looks pretty simple, no cream sauce or anything, 2,710 calories. and coming in at number one on the extreme eating list, the cheesecake factory's bistro shrimp pasta. it's because that shri
cohen's sap capital could be bracing from the big hour of squawk. you can't afford to miss this next deal in congress. it's going hit your take home pay line by line. it's more money than you might have thought coming up at 7:00 eastern time. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> welcome back to "squawk box" this morning. u.s. equities at this hour, we have red arrows. dow off about 11 points this morning. the nasdaq off 1.5 points. s&p 500 marginally off about a point this morning. sap capital telling business employees and parter ners it's bracing for employee withdraw. the journal says this is amid intense regulatory scrutiny of alleged insider trading at sac. worth noting, only around 6 billion comes from outside incident investors. the rest is his money. clients have unti
the top of this morning by mr. cohen -- the op ed by mr. cohen. we will discuss the accuracy, historical and artistically inside, but does a masterful job in suggesting in the real world there are no right angles and no easy answers to very difficult situations. that, to me, was a great service. >> i also liked the movie. it was very entertaining, but it is a movie, and there were some things i really liked and things i did not like. i did not like, for example, the portrayal of the enhanced interrogation techniques. i did not like the fact that it made a false link between torture and intelligence successes. i also think torture does not work, and our programs work because it was not tortured. there were other things i liked about the movie. i liked the fact that it conveyed that this was a 10-year marathon parian rather than a sprint -- rather than a sprint by a president, and the agency was the focus of this effort and succeeded because of the commitment, dedication, and tenacity of its people. i like the fact that it showed the enhanced interrogation program had something to do with
complications and even death. cnn senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spoke to a mom who saved her son's life by fast action. >> reporter: darius carr is so sick with the flu, he's in the hospital. he could have died if not for the quick thinking of his mother. robbie perry was keeping a close eye on her son at home. he didn't seem all that sick. then suddenly wednesday night -- >> he couldn't hardly breathe. he was, you know, gasping for, you know, breath, and that was real scary because i thought he was going to pass out at any minute. >> reporter: robbie immediately brought her 7-year-old son to the emergency room. it's just a short drive away, but by the time they got there darius was incoherent. how did you feel in your heart when your own son didn't know who you were? >> you don't want to think the worst but as
cohen, i think there are others who sort of say we've seen the end of growth. no more innovation, no more growth, we've now just got to settle down and deal with the fact that we're not going to have anymore growth. and i think the evidence is really strongly against that. there is in your pack and i'm doing a little bit of a plug here, james is a senior, external senior fellow here at brookings as well as director at the mckinsey global institute, and he and i are working on a project with the support of others looking at this question what are some of the game changers, what are the ways in which we can get innovation and, actually, as we get out of this mess on the deficit and the recession really start to get stronger growth in the economy. and the thing that's really needed, the thing that we didn't have in the first, even the first seven years of this century was sort of innovation-driven, output-driven growth. we had a lot of restructuring productivity but we haven't really had for some years now real output-driven innovation and growth, and that's part of what we're looki
the sasha baron cohen thing going. we'd love to hear from you. >>> mary thompson has more for us. >> shares of western digital, top performer in the s&p 500 right now. just up over 4%. it reports earnings tomorrow. today getting a bit of a lift from an addition to the portfolio of storage products for small and medium size businesses. again, this is coming off a nice run for a lot of these storage companies, since november. some optimism on earnings as well. the rival sea gate technology reporting strong sales. a positive forecast when it reported earlier this month. back to you guys. >> thanks a lot, mary. the when we come back, the coo of las vegas sands on the state of gaming and the bets his company is making overseas. we're back in a minute. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all on thinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ >>> good morning. welcome back to los angeles to the wor
cohen, amid this big investigation on insider trading is in davos. a number of people have seen him walking around saying hello to people. i don't know if he's talking about the investigation. at a time you might think he would hide, he is out and about. a lot of people talking about who is not here almost sometimes as important as who is on the list. among those who are not coming this year, some big questions about what this means, what it says about davos. the whole google contingent, they used to throw a huge party friday nights the past several years, they opted out completely. what does that mean? bill clinton a regular is not here. and jim bryan and while we're on the air j. they're interviewing derek jeter of all things. i don't know if you can think of derek jeter as a guy at davos. they did lunch together and tina brown tweeting up a storm was actually about lance armstrong. derek said he should have admitted his mistake and moved on but that he fooled everyone, including me, i know, joe, you weren't that fooled. that's what's been going on in davos. we will have more thro
, tyler cohen, i think there are others -- who sort of say we've seen the end of growth. no more growth. we've now just got to sort of settle down and deal with the fact that we're not going to have anymore growth. and i think the evidence is really strongly against that. there is in your pack, and i'm doing a little bit of a plug here, an external senior fellow here at brookings as well as director of the mckinsey global institute, and he and i are working on a project with the support of others looking at in this question what are some of the game changers, what are the ways in which we can get innovation and actually as we get out of this mess on the deficit and the recession really start to get stronger growth in the economy? and the thing that's really needed, the thing that we didn't have in the first, even the first seven years of this century was sort of innovation-driven, output-driven growth. we had a lot of restructuring productivity, but we haven't really had it for some years now real output-driven innovation and growth, and that's part of what we're looking for and part of
payout is going to be lower. look at this year over year. gary cohen, blankfein. they invite people to stay and blow them up if they -- you know, if you do a piece of business and it backfired a quarter later, huh-uh, call it back. everything gorman is doing is, i think, back to earth. >> it is a different firm than goldman. in the old days, if goldman put up a quarter like this -- >> morgan is up this morning. >> i don't know if there's a lot in the conversation there. they don't expect there to be a -- >> morgan stanley went to the ubs model. >> interesting story here. i don't think they're ready to do it. we brought up day one when we saw the ubs shares climb so high, when they pushed out the investment banking. certainly not fixed income. what does morgan stanley do? would they conceivably consider going that route? i don't know they're ready to yet. but this comp plan in some ways -- >> there's a stream going through all these that people shouldn't be fooled at home about. maybe they're not miking as much as they used to. there's still a tale of two cities in this country. i re
, they need amazon. i still -- listen, kim cohen on last week, still a good story. the real estate investment companies have not been amazon, so to speak, because there are still a lot of new players that want to come in. amazon is just a phenomena. and so many people bet against it. and it has been a terrible bet. >> even with sales tax being paid in many jurisdictions. it was a concern for so long, but it doesn't seem to -- >> it was a bear. >> we should point out before we get to bob pisani, lumina shares down about 9% this morning. the chairman saying at -- roach, excuse me, which we knew had made a hostile bid afforded by lumina last year. that laroche saying they had no interest at this point in pursuing that acquisition. you may recall, those shares rallied sharply towards the end of the year on a french newspaper report that at the time i said i was completely unfamiliar with anything going on there -- >> you said, don't trust it. which was a great call. >> thanks. >> do not trust it. >> it did move the stock up a lot. a lot of that and more being taken out today on that news on i ill
. >> we're going to continue this conversation. coming up cohen and company voice chairman thomas strauss is going to join us to discuss what he's expecting from the markets in 2013. plus how is small business feeling about the state of the economy? national federation of independent business is going to be releasing its latest survey and we've got chief economist to break down those numbers. at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared informati
more than i need. >> yeah, but most vitamins -- >> i know, the excess washes away. >> right. the cohen ziems and the reaction that you need there for the reaction, but you only need the amounts that you need for it to happen. anything over and above that is superfluous. and it goes out in your pee. so i'm not saying you shouldn't be able to make money with it. in fact, there have been some people who have made a lot of money. herb greenberg has a great documentary, which i watched yesterday online. >> he's focusing on herbalife, which is perfect for him. >> he's been working on it a long time. he's dug into interviews, he's -- was the bottom line? what is the lead for herb's piece spp. >> the question becomes is it a upon zee scheme or not? he talks to the company, he talks to some of the distributors who have had complaints, say that they got drawn into it. in fact, the last quote is from a woman who says this is not what i signed up for. >> do the products help anyone? >> i didn't dig into that. that part was not brought up in these 20 minutes. >> what's the biggest products? >> i do
because -- >> that's right. >> you and google idea director jerry cohen are publishing a book called "the new digital age." can you give us an idea or preview on what the book is going to cover? i presume some of the things you have been talking about. >> we sat down over the last 18 mont, traveled around the world and talked to people about where they thought technology was going and more importantly, how society would adapt to it, a we came to the end of the book with a very optimistic view of this. a simple way of thinking about it, let's go back to the economist. it covers dictators, economic problems, corruption, technological innovation, health care issues and general sort of things. >> a google occasionally. >> last week. >> yes, we were on the cover and covered us as well. so let's go through each of those. how to you solve the back dictator problem? you empower the simpsons. unless the dictator is willing to some out down the internet and shoot everybody can they're getting desperate enough to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected coun
will publish a book because -- >> that's right. >> you and google idea director jerry cohen are publishing a book called "the new digital age." can you give us an idea or preview on what the book is going to cover? i presume some of the things you have been talking about. >> we sat down over the last 18 months, traveled around the world and talked to people about where they thought technology was going and more importantly, how society would adapt to it, and we came to the end of the book with a very optimistic view of this. a simple way of thinking about it, let's go back to the economist. it covers dictators, economic problems, corruption, technological innovation, health care issues and general sort of things. >> and google occasionally. >> last week. >> yes, we were on the cover and covered us as well. so let's go through each of those. how to you solve the back dictator problem? you empower the simpsons. unless the dictator is willing to some out down the internet and shoot everybody can they're getting desperate enough to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is cert
to the ceo of cohen and company about a possible extension of america's debt limit. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." four dow components reporting earnings this morning. all four are on the move. insurance company travelers earned 72 cents a share for the fourth quarter. that was much better than estimated of 14 cents. earnings were helped by a significant increase in underwriting margins and many times we give travelers earnings and scratch our head sometimes. sometimes they're low. sometimes they're high. but the stock price has been a thing of beauty to behold. dupont earned 11 cents a share, excluding certain items. and now it's four cents above estimates. it's 2013 thought look is also indicated higher. verizon reported fourth quarter profit of 38 cents a share. >> but this is where -- >> that was below 50 -- >> the
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